Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected


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They are intended to encourage and promote collective action by all sectors of society.

In order to achieve their long-term biodiversity outcomes, federal, provincial, and territorial government developed the following set of medium-term goals and targets. These aspirational goals and targets describe results to be achieved through the collective efforts of a diversity of players both public and private whose actions and decisions have an impact on biodiversity. Governments need to do their part but cannot act alone. Local communities, urban and regional governments, business and industry, conservation and stewardship groups, educational and scientific institutions and citizens are also all able to contribute.

Canadians are invited to commit to doing their part and to share the results of their efforts. In , Canada reviewed progress towards the national biodiversity targets. The details of this assessment are contained in Canada's 6th National Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Canada's 6th National Report takes stock of efforts by Canada's partners in biodiversity conservation, describes the status of Canada's progress towards meeting each of it national targets, and illustrates Canada's contributions to the global Aichi targets.

Goal A. By , Canada's lands and waters are planned and managed using an ecosystem approach to support biodiversity conservation outcomes at local, regional and national scales. Target 1. By , at least 17 percent of terrestrial areas and inland water, and 10 percent of coastal and marine areas, are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures. Target 2. Target 3.

Why is biodiversity important?

By , Canada's wetlands are conserved or enhanced to sustain their ecosystem services through retention, restoration and management activities. Target 4. By , biodiversity considerations are integrated into municipal planning and activities of major municipalities across Canada.


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Target 5. Goal B. By , direct and indirect pressures as well as cumulative effects on biodiversity are reduced, and production and consumption of Canada's biological resources are more sustainable. Target 6. By , continued progress is made on the sustainable management of Canada's forests. Target 7. By , agricultural working landscapes provide a stable or improved level of biodiversity and habitat capacity.

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Target 8. By , all aquaculture in Canada is managed under a science-based regime that promotes the sustainable use of aquatic resources including marine, freshwater and land based in ways that conserve biodiversity. Target 9. By , all fish and invertebrate stocks and aquatic plants are managed and harvested sustainably, legally and applying ecosystem-based approaches. Target By , pollution levels in Canadian waters, including pollution from excess nutrients, are reduced or maintained at levels that support healthy aquatic ecosystems.

By , pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified, and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species. By , customary use by Aboriginal peoples of biological resources is maintained, compatible with their conservation and sustainable use. By , innovative mechanisms for fostering the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity are developed and applied. Goal C. By , Canadians have adequate and relevant information about biodiversity and ecosystem services to support conservation planning and decision-making.

By , Aboriginal traditional knowledge is respected, promoted and, where made available by Aboriginal peoples, regularly, meaningfully and effectively informing biodiversity conservation and management decision-making. By , Canada has a comprehensive inventory of protected spaces that includes private conservation areas.

By , measures of natural capital related to biodiversity and ecosystem services are developed on a national scale, and progress is made in integrating them into Canada's national statistical system. Goal D. By , Canadians are informed about the value of nature and more actively engaged in its stewardship. By , biodiversity is integrated into the elementary and secondary school curricula. By , more Canadians get out into nature and participate in biodiversity conservation activities. Canada's natural spaces are a vital component of our culture, heritage, economy and our future, and they are of global importance.

Canada's forests, wetlands, prairies, tundra and oceans provide essential ecosystem services. Protecting these important areas from degradation is one of our key means of conserving biodiversity in Canada and is vital in maintaining the ecosystem services provided by these areas. Canada's parks and protected areas provide a living legacy for future generations of Canadians, affording opportunities for people to discover and learn about nature. Canada has made great progress through the creation of national, provincial, and municipal parks and many other types of conservation areas that complement the role of protected areas in conserving nature.

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As pressures that threaten to degrade natural areas continue to increase, even greater effort is required to protect our land and water through a variety of means. This target for Canada is linked with the global Aichi Target The majority of this area is within federal, provincial and territorial protected areas networks.

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In addition, all sectors of society, including business, the non-profit sector, landowners and citizens have an important role to play in conserving natural areas in their community and on private land. It will be important to continue to focus on areas that are ecologically representative and important for biodiversity and ecosystem services, and to ensure that these areas are well-connected and effectively managed. Further, there is a need to integrate these areas into the wider landscapes and seascapes in which they are situated.

Terrestrial areas and inland water : All land and water above the high-tide line including lakes, rivers, and streams. Coastal and marine areas: Coastline below the high-tide line, coastal estuaries and salt marshes, and ocean waters contained within Canada's marine territory. Protected area : A clearly defined geographical space recognized, dedicated, and managed, through legal or other effective means, to achieve the long-term conservation of nature with associated ecosystem services and cultural values.

International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Other effective area-based conservation measures OCM : Spatially explicit measures that are focused on long-term conservation, address threats to biodiversity, and provide a net conservation benefit, but are not formally designated protected areas. Canada is engaging in domestic and international conservations about how OCM will be tracked and reported. The area of land and water that is protected in Canada is a measure of human response to the loss of biodiversity and natural habitat.


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  8. The two indicators for this target rely on up-to-date data on protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures in Canada, both on land and at sea. These sources capture information on protected areas and, increasingly capture information on private protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures. By , this data will provide a comprehensive picture of all the protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures in Canada. Target 16 By , Canada has a comprehensive inventory of protected spaces that includes private conservation areas , highlights this effort.

    Canada is home to a unique variety of plants and animals.

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    Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the - Google книги

    These species not only represent Canada's rich biodiversity, but are also an integral part of Canadians' natural and cultural heritage. Each species plays a key role in maintaining the overall health of ecosystems — ensuring the health of native populations of species is fundamental to preserving Canada's biodiversity and the benefits that it provides. However, the well-being of some of these species is under threat. When a plant or an animal is determined to be at risk under federal law, plans for its recovery or management must be made.

    Concerted effort at local, provincial, territorial and federal levels is essential to ensure improvements in the condition of species and meet the objectives laid out in recovery strategies. Canada's approach aims to prevent wildlife species from becoming extinct by securing the necessary actions for their recovery, while managing other species to prevent them from becoming at risk.

    Meeting this target will involve continued consultation and cooperation with Canadians on the protection of species in Canada.

    Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected
    Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected
    Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected
    Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected
    Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected
    Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected Biodiversity, Sustainability and Human Communities: Protecting Beyond the Protected
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